Four Most Important Mathas In India

A matha is a Sanskrit word meaning “institute or college”, and it additionally refers to a religious residence in Hinduism.

Monastic life, for religious studies or the pursuit of moksha (spiritual liberation) traces it roots to the first millennium BCE, within the religious writing tradition.

The earliest Hindu mathas are indirectly inferred to be from the centuries round the begin of the Common era, supported the existence of Sannyasa Upanishads with powerfully Advaita Vedanta content.

The matha tradition in Hinduism was possible well established within the half of first millennium atomic number 58, as is proven by archaeological and epigraphical proof.

Mathas grew over time, with the foremost famed and still extant centers of Hinduism studies being those started by Adi Shankara. alternative major and influential mathas belong to numerous schools of Hindu philosophy, like those of Vaishnavism and Shaivism.The religious residence feed students, gurus and are led by Acharyas.

Govardhana matha

Goverdhana Matha

The Govardhana matha is a religious residence placed within the town of Puri in Odisha state (India). it’s related to the Jagannath temple and is one amongst the four cardinal mathas supported by Adi Shankara within the eighth century ce.

The deities here are Jagannath (Vishnu) and also the Devi Vimala (Bhairavi). The mahavakya is Prajnanam Brahma. There area unit Shri Vigraha of Goverdhan Nath Krishna and Ardhanarishvara Shiva put in by Adi Shankara.

The whole of the eastern a part of the Indian landmass is taken into account because the territory of Sri Govardhan Peeth.

Sringeri Sharada Peetham

Sringeri peetham

Sringeri Sharada Peetham is one among the four Advaita vedanta religious residence (mathas in India) established by Adi Shankara around 800 AD in Sringeri (Karnataka), the others being Dwaraka (Gujarat), Govardhana (Odisha) and Jyotirmath (Uttarakhand).The Sringeri matha is on the banks of the Tunga stream in Chikkamagalur district placed within the Western Ghats, India.

The Sringeri Sharada Peetham site includes 2 major temples, one dedicated to Shiva (Vidyashankara Linga, tenth Shankara memorial) and therefore the alternative to Saraswati (Sharada Amba). The Vidyashankara temple was designed throughout the Vijayanagara Empire era on a sq. plan set within circles within the Tuluvas and Hoysala niche vogue.

It includes shrines and relief carving in reverence of major Hindu gods and goddesses like Brahma, Vishnu (all Dasavatara, with Buddha), Shiva, Saraswati, Parvati, Lakshmi, Ganesha, Shanmukha (Kartikeya, Murugan), Durga, Kali and more. The stone reliefs additionally embody an outsized style of Hindu legends from the epics and therefore the Puranas.

Dvaraka Pitha

Dwaraka matha

Dwaraka maţha, also referred to as Sharada Peeth is an ancient monastery set within the coastal town of Dwaraka, Gujarat, India.

It’s one of the four cardinal mathas in India or seats of learning based by Adi Shankara in eighth Century ce, and is that the pascimāmnāya matha, or western matha. it’s also referred to as the Kālikā Matha, and per the tradition initiated by Adi Shankara it represents Sama Veda.

Jyotir Math

Jyotir Math

Jyotir maths or Jyotir Pitha is a cloister placed within the town of Jyotirmath, India. generally referred to as uttarāmnāya matha or northern monastery, it’s one in all the four ancient mathas of India established by Adi Shankara within the eighth century cerium and its appointees bear the title of Shankaracharya.

Jyotir math holds authority over Atharvaveda. Their Vedantic mantra or their Mahavakya is “Ayam Atma Brahma”. Jyotir matha is the headquarters of Giri, Parbat & Sagar sects of the Dasnami doctrine order. It is one of the four most sacred mathas in India.

Also Read: Char Dham of India

Some of Other Famous Mathas in India are:

  • Ramachandrapura Math, Karnataka
  • Gaudapadacharya Matha, Goa
  • Kashi Math, Uttar Pradesh
  • Kanchi Matha, Tamil Nadu
  • Belur Matha, West Bengal

Also Read: Top 10 Richest Temples in India

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